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Development of vegetation and soil on high elevation reclaimed lands in southeastern British Columbia

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Title: Development of vegetation and soil on high elevation reclaimed lands in southeastern British Columbia
Author: Fyles, Jim W.; Milne, I. H.; Bell, Marcus A. M.
Issue Date: 1981
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2010-01-08
Series/Report no. British Columbia Mine Reclamation Symposium 1981
Abstract: Seeded grasses and legumes become established on waste dumps in the first growing season following seeding and significant growth takes place in the second year. The vegetation appears to be dependent on fertilization for approximately five years. Older reclaimed areas support shoot and root growth, soil CO2 evolution, and available soil organic matter at levels similar to those at undisturbed grasslands. Native soils contain higher levels of humus although reclaimed soils may contain resistant organic matter originally derived from coal or carbonaceous shale. Carbon and nitrogen compounds, indiginous in the waste rock, may play an important role in the development of reclaimed areas.
Affiliation: Applied Science, Faculty of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/17795

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