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Lesbian, gay, bisexual and questioning adolescents : their social experiences and the role of supportive adults in high school

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Title: Lesbian, gay, bisexual and questioning adolescents : their social experiences and the role of supportive adults in high school
Author: Darwich, Lina Lotfi
Degree Master of Arts - MA
Program Human Development, Learning and Culture
Copyright Date: 2008
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2008-09-19
Subject Keywords School safety; Sexual orientation; Adolescence
Abstract: The extant research on the experiences of lesbian/gay, bisexual, and questioning —unsure- (LGBQ) youth shows that they have a lower sense of belonging and safety a tschool, are more likely to be victims of various types of bullying and to skip school, and use drugs and alcohol than their straight peers. Lately, however, a shift in direction towards examining the protective factors, which promote the well being of LGBQ youth, is happening. Extending the emerging research on this shift, the present study investigated the role of supportive adults at school in predicting LGBQ youth sense of safety and belonging. Also, this study examined whether adult support moderated the relationship between sexual orientation victimization and skipping school for LGBQ youth separately. The participants in this study (N = 19,551) were students (grades 8 through 12) enrolled in high schools that took part in a district-wide survey in a large, ethnically and economically diverse urban school district in British Columbia. Results showed that perceptions of adult support played a significant role in predicting the safety and belonging of LGBQ youth. Adult support significantly moderated the relationship between sexual orientation victimization and skipping school for bisexual and questioning youth but not for lesbian/gay youth. The implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed in the last section of this thesis.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/2286

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