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A decision support system for harvest scheduling and log processing at the Malcolm Knapp Research Forest in Maple Ridge, British Columbia

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Title: A decision support system for harvest scheduling and log processing at the Malcolm Knapp Research Forest in Maple Ridge, British Columbia
Author: Huang, Ye
Subject Keywords Linear programming model;Forest operations;Malcolm Knapp Research Forest
Issue Date: 2012-04
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2012-07-16
Series/Report no. University of British Columbia, Forestry Undergraduate Essays/Theses, 2011 winter session, FRST 497
Abstract: This essay develops prototypes of linear programming-based models to project the harvesting level, lumber production, and net revenue of a harvesting plan in order to support forest operation decision-making in the Malcolm Knapp Research Forest (MFRF) in Maple Ridge, British Columbia. Field data were collected from 3 different biogeoclimatic zones within the research forest. Growth and yield of the forest was modeled by Table Interpolation Program for Stand Yields (TIPSY) which is a stand- and forest-level model developed by the British Columbia Ministry of Forest and Range. Then, the growth and yield data were imported into a forest estate linear programming model to forecast the volume of logs harvested from the forest. A sawing pattern model was used to design the sawing pattern and generate Lumber Recovery Factors by log diameter. Subsequently, a log-to-product linear programming model was used to estimate the final lumber production, mill working hours and the net profit for the forest. The results predict that the mill can earn $3,110,141 by producing 141,229 MBF of lumber and 298,818 m³ of chips over a 60-year planning horizon. Sensitivity analysis included different sawing patterns, price fluctuations and limited mill operating hours. Some potential improvements in model structure, efficiency, availability for big diameter log, and carbon credits are also discussed. Although the forest data and the sawmill configuration used in the models are different from reality, it will not be difficult to modify the model for MKRF.
Affiliation: Forestry, Faculty of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/42711
Peer Review Status: Unreviewed
Scholarly Level: Undergraduate

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