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Two dimensional loop shaping controller design for paper machine cross-directional processes

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Title: Two dimensional loop shaping controller design for paper machine cross-directional processes
Author: Stewart, Gregory Edward
Degree Doctor of Philosophy - PhD
Program Electrical and Computer Engineering
Copyright Date: 2000
Abstract: The objective of this work is the development of a practical technique for the design of feedback controllers for the cross-directional control of paper machines. An industrial paper machine produces a wide sheet of paper which is required to be of uniform quality in terms of the weight, moisture content, and caliper (thickness). Modern machines produce a paper sheet which is up to 11 metres in width and is properly described as a two dimensional system. The direction perpendicular to the sheet travel is known as the cross-direction, and cross-directional control is implemented by arrays of up to 300 identical actuators evenly distributed across the sheet width. The sheet properties are measured by a scanning sensor at up to 2000 locations evenly spaced across the width of the moving paper sheet. A constructive, computationally inexpensive, graphical controller design technique is developed for dynamical systems that are distributed in one spatial dimension and controlled by an array of identical actuators. The feedback controller is designed using a two dimensional loop shaping technique with reference to the process model and the model uncertainty such that the spatial and dynamical bandwidth limitations of the physical system are respected. The two dimensional loop shaping design technique is then applied to the design of cross-directional feedback controllers for the paper making process. The two dimensional loop shaping approach is well-suited to address the wide variety of processes and conditions for which a cross-directional controller must perform well. The design technique is demonstrated by successfully tuning an industrial crossdirectional controller. The tuning results are confirmed by experiments with a real paper machine in a working mill.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/11221
Series/Report no. UBC Retrospective Theses Digitization Project [http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/retro_theses/]

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