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Upsetting Fake Ideas: Jeannette Armstrong's Slash and Beatrice Culleton's April Raintree

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Title: Upsetting Fake Ideas: Jeannette Armstrong's Slash and Beatrice Culleton's April Raintree
Author: Fee, Margery
Subject Keywords Aboriginal literature;stereotypes of "the Indian";activism;American Indian Movement;foster homes;"Sixties Scoop"
Issue Date: 1990
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2009-08-05
Publisher Canadian Literature
Citation: Margery Fee. "Upsetting Fake Ideas: Jeannette Armstrong's Slash and Beatrice Culleton's April Raintree." Canadian Literature 124-25 (1990): 168-80.
Abstract: Both novels expose the "fake idea" that Aboriginal people in Canada can freely choose their identities. The dominant discourse forces a choice on them: assimilate or vanish. Those who refuse the choice face harsh racism. In April Raintree, April assimilates and her sister commits suicide; both "choices" forced on them by racism. In Slash, the hero realizes that it is crucial to retain his identity as an Okanagan person rather than to exhaust himself as an activist. Both novels end with a baby who will be raised in the traditions of his culture. Activism is seen as a dangerous choice for those too young to understand their identity.
Affiliation: English, Dept of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/11685
Peer Review Status: Peer-Reviewed

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