Go to  Advanced Search

Teenage killers : a comprehensive examination of Canadian youth-perpetrated homicide, psychopathy, motivation, violence, and the number of perpetrators

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
ubco_2009_fall_agar_ava.pdf 917.7Kb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: Teenage killers : a comprehensive examination of Canadian youth-perpetrated homicide, psychopathy, motivation, violence, and the number of perpetrators
Author: Agar, Ava Dawn
Degree Master of Arts - MA
Program Psychology
Copyright Date: 2009
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2009-08-17
Abstract: Homicide is, arguably, the most extreme type of criminal behaviour. Despite its obvious importance, relatively little empirical research has been conducted on youth homicide—with even less focusing on Canadian data. Recent research on Canadian adult-perpetrated homicides (e.g., M. Juodis, M. Woodworth, S. Porter, & L. ten Brinke, in press; M. Woodworth & S. Porter, 2002) indicates that homicides can be reliably differentiated across particular offence characteristics (i.e., motivation, psychopathy, and the number of perpetrators). Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the potential differences in the characteristics of Canadian youth-perpetrated homicide across motivation, psychopathy, and the number of perpetrators. Clinical files (N=105) of youth charged with homicide between 1990 and 2008 were coded across a number of items designed to capture youth-specific variables. Results revealed important significant differences. Specifically, youth were more likely to commit instrumental than reactive homicides (p <.001). However, low psychopathy youth were 4 times more likely to commit reactive homicides when acting alone (p <.01), whereas youth scoring high on psychopathy showed a preference for instrumental homicides, regardless of the number of perpetrators. Additionally, only the affective component of psychopathy predicted instrumentality (p <.05). Gratuitous and sexual violence were also more likely when a high psychopathy youth was involved in the homicide (p <.01). Finally, youth committed substantially more homicides with accomplices and against strangers than previously reported. Implications for prevention, treatment, and criminal investigation of youth-perpetrated homicides are discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/12264

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893