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OVERVIEW OF REGIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 AS GAS HYDRATE IN CANADA

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Title: OVERVIEW OF REGIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 AS GAS HYDRATE IN CANADA
Author: Wright, J. Frederick; Cote, M.M.; Dallimore, Scott R.
Subject Keywords geological sequestration;carbon dioxide;gas hydrates;ICGH 2008;International Conference on Gas Hydrates 2008
Issue Date: 2008-07
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2008-09-17
Citation: Wright, J. Frederick; Cote, M.M.; Dallimore, Scott R. 2008. OVERVIEW OF REGIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 AS GAS HYDRATE IN CANADA. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008.
Abstract: The responsible management and reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere requires consideration of alternative options for disposal and long-term sequestration of CO2 generated at hydrocarbon-fueled power plants and large industrial sources. A number of “conventional” options for geological sequestration of CO2 are currently being evaluated worldwide, including disposal of CO2 in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, in deep saline aquifers, and in unrecoverable coal beds, typically in gaseous or liquid form or as a supercritical fluid. Although these geological settings may constitute the most readily accessible sites for immediate utilization, it is unlikely that they represent sufficient cumulative storage capacity to keep pace with global CO2 production and future disposal requirements. In addition, the requirement for long-term maintenance of CO2 sequestered in fluid form, raises concerns regarding the possible mobility of disposed CO2 over the longer term. The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) has investigated potential opportunities to sequester CO2 in solid form in Canadian geologic reservoirs having pressure and temperature conditions suitable for the formation and long-term stability of CO2 hydrate. Initial screening of candidate reservoirs has identified substantial potentials for CO2 sequestration as gas hydrate in extensive porous sandstone and limestone formations beneath portions of the Canadian Great Lakes, and in areas of the Mackenzie-Beaufort hydrocarbon development region in northern Canada. A significant but less robust capacity has been identified in the oil and gas production regions of northeastern Alberta.
Affiliation: OtherOther
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/2236
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