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An evaluation of factors influencing spontaneous vegetation succession in northern latitude disturbances : assessment of natural recolonization of disturbances in Yukon

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dc.contributor.author Lister, D.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-12-10T00:06:44Z
dc.date.available 2010-12-10T00:06:44Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2429/30354
dc.description.abstract Twenty sites surveyed in Yukon in 2009 indicate that moisture availability is often a key limiting factor on natural recolonization of disturbed sites in the territory. In some cases, natural recolonization processes may also be impeded by a thickly established seeded cover, and at other sites, a seeded cover appeared to have no clear positive or negative effect relative to non-seeded sites. Five invasive species were identified at the sites surveyed, and predominantly occurred at seeded sites. The most commonly colonizing native species across the 20-site dataset are the balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera), willow (Salix spp.), and fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) and common yarrow (Achillea millefolium). en
dc.language.iso eng en
dc.relation.ispartofseries British Columbia Mine Reclamation Symposium 2010 en
dc.title An evaluation of factors influencing spontaneous vegetation succession in northern latitude disturbances : assessment of natural recolonization of disturbances in Yukon en
dc.type text en
dc.type.text conference Paper en
dc.description.affiliation Applied Science, Faculty of en
dc.description.reviewstatus Unreviewed en
dc.rights.copyright British Columbia Technical and Research Committee on Reclamation en
dc.description.scholarlevel Unknown en


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