Go to  Advanced Search

The effect of artificial drainage in waterlogged sites on the foliar nutrient status of planted interior spruce seedlings in the Central Interior BC

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
SaraivaMariaFernanda_FRST_498_Graduating_Thesis_2008.pdf 736.5Kb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: The effect of artificial drainage in waterlogged sites on the foliar nutrient status of planted interior spruce seedlings in the Central Interior BC
Author: Saraiva, Maria Fernanda
Subject Keywords ditching, waterlogged sites, foliar macronutrient, foliar concentration, foliar content, distance effect, Interior Spruce
Issue Date: 2009-04-13
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2011-02-23
Series/Report no. University of British Columbia, Forestry Undergraduate Essays/Theses, 2008 winter session, FRST 498
Abstract: Drainage of waterlogged sites following harvest is a silvicultural treatment to reduce water table levels; therefore, potentially improving seedling growth. The goal of this study was to assess foliar nutrient status changes of planted hybrid interior spruce (Picea glauca x Picea englemannii [Moench] Voss) seedlings as a result of artificial drainage of waterlogged sites located in the central interior of British Columbia. Ditches were constructed near the end of the 2007 growing season, and foliar samples were collected and analysed for foliar unit mass and macronutrient concentrations and contents in the fall of 2007 (pre-ditching conditions) and in the fall of 2008 (post ditching conditions). Two way ANOVA and correlation analyses were used to determine and interpret significant responses. Concentration and content of foliar B and Al decreased and foliar K increased near and away from the ditch. These trends can be used as immediate indicators of ditch effects. The effect of distance from the ditchline on changes of foliar nutrient status was not conclusive. Overall, ditching appeared to be detrimental to health of seedlings in the short term. Longer term trends need to be examined for an understanding of any improvement in plant productivity and establishment of a new steady state.
Affiliation: Forestry, Faculty of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/31673
Peer Review Status: Unreviewed

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893