Go to  Advanced Search

Putting People in Parks: A case study on the impact of community involvement in conservation

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
ConnollyApril_CONS_498_Graduating_Thesis_2009.pdf 398.0Kb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: Putting People in Parks: A case study on the impact of community involvement in conservation
Author: Connolly, April
Subject Keywords community-based conservation, Gwaii Haanas, National Park Reserve, British Columbia, Canada, Richtersveld Transfrontier Park, South Africa
Issue Date: 2010-04-12
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2011-02-24
Series/Report no. University of British Columbia, Forestry Undergraduate Essays/Theses, 2009 winter session, CONS 498
Abstract: Traditional methods of conservation involving the development of strict park boundaries have proven ineffective on a global scale as they do not take into consideration the needs and desires of local communities. This paper demonstrates that incorporating community involvement into the management of conservation areas is a more effective means of developing local-specific and sustainable conservation programs than the traditional park system. These community-based conservation projects have been adopted in both developed and developing countries worldwide. By comparing two case study community-based conservation projects in a developed (Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve in Canada) and a developing (Richtersveld Transfrontier Park in South Africa) country, this paper reveals differences and similarities that can be applied to the incorporation of community involvement in conservation as a whole. The main difference between community-based conservation in developing and developed countries is the emphasis placed on rural development over conservation as a management goal; with developing countries emphasizing rural development and developed countries emphasizing conservation. Despite differences in the importance of rural development, many similarities lie between community-based conservation in developing and developed countries, such as the mindset of local people and the human rights issues involving land claims. The similarities and differences between community-based conservation in developing and developed countries are necessary to better adapt conservation to local needs and the long-term sustainability of natural resources.
Affiliation: Forestry, Faculty of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/31709
Peer Review Status: Unreviewed

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893