Go to  Advanced Search

Women’s work and family roles in a bicultural context : the case of Indochinese refugees

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
ubc_1992_fall_wing_jennifer_lynn.pdf 2.543Mb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: Women’s work and family roles in a bicultural context : the case of Indochinese refugees
Author: Wing, Jennifer Lynn
Degree Master of Arts - MA
Program Family Studies
Copyright Date: 1992
Abstract: This study examines women's work and family roles in a bicultural context. The Deacon and Firebaugh family resource management framework was used to develop a model to investigate (a) how women integrate two cultures' values towards work and family roles; (b) how orientations towards these roles affect perceptions of interrole compatibility; (c) how orientations towards these roles affect satisfaction with health, standard of living, job, and psychological well-being; and (d) how interrole compatibility perceptions affect satisfaction with health, standard of living, job, and psychological well-being. Data were from the third wave of an ongoing 10-year longitudinal study on refugee resettlement. All seventy-five women that comprised the sample held work and family roles. Measures were constructed to assess orientations towards work and family roles, perceptions of interrole compatibility, and involvement in each of the roles. Results found support for a typology of work and family role orientations which placed women into the categories of Assimilated, Integrated Type I, Integrated Type II, and Separated. The Assimilated and Integrated Type I group scored higher on interrole compatibility perceptions; the Assimilated group was found to have higher levels of satisfaction with their health and greater well-being than the other three groups. No support was found for the effects of interrole compatibility on satisfaction with health, standard of living, job, and well being. Results of these findings are discussed in terms of the model developed for the study, and in terms of the issues raised about acculturation and immigrant womens' experience with work and family roles.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/3221
Series/Report no. UBC Retrospective Theses Digitization Project [http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/retro_theses/]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893