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Capacitive charging and background processes in carbon nanotube yarn actuators

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Title: Capacitive charging and background processes in carbon nanotube yarn actuators
Author: Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Kozlov, Mikhail; Zhang, Mei; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.; Madden, John D.
Issue Date: 2007
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2011-06-01
Publisher Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Citation: Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Kozlov, Mikhail; Zhang, Mei; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.; Madden, John D. W. Capacitive charging and background processes in carbon nanotube yarn actuators. Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2007, edited by Yoseph Bar-Cohen, Proceedings of SPIE Volume 6524, 65241H, 2007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.715795
Abstract: Twist-spun carbon nanotube yarns actuate when extra charge is added to the yarn. This charge can be stored in a doublelayer capacitor formed when the yarn is submersed in an electrolyte. The dependence of the actuation stress and strain on the stored charge must be studied if double layer charging models are to be fully verified over large potential ranges. However, background currents are generated in the system when an electrical potential is applied, making it hard to discern the charge stored in the actuator and the charge that passes through the cell due to faradaic processes. A model is developed to separate the capacitive and faradaic portions of the actuator current. The model is then applied to the analysis of the actuation data. The consistency of the results paves the way to understanding the real strain-charge behavior of the actuator. Copyright 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.
Affiliation: Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dept of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/35027
Peer Review Status: Reviewed
Scholarly Level: Faculty

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