Go to  Advanced Search

Alignment and calibration of high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) 1D transducers using a dual wedge-tri step phantom

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
Rohling_SPIE_7964_796428.pdf 1.469Mb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: Alignment and calibration of high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) 1D transducers using a dual wedge-tri step phantom
Author: Afsham, Narges; Chan, K.; Pan, L.; Tang, S.; Rohling, Robert N.
Issue Date: 2011
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2011-07-05
Publisher Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Citation: Afsham, N.; Chan, K.; Pan, L.; Tang, S.; Rohling, Robert N. Alignment and calibration of high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) 1D transducers using a dual wedge-tri step phantom. Medical Imaging 2011: Visualization, Image-Guided Procedures, and Modeling, edited by Kenneth H. Wong, David R. Holmes III Proceedings of SPIE Volume 7964,796428, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.878182
Abstract: This paper introduces a novel alignment and calibration method for high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) 1D transducers. 2D images are constructed by means of translation of the transducers using a linear motor stage. Physical alignment of the transducers is needed in order to capture images of the same crosssectional plane, and calibration is needed to determine the relative coordinates of the images, including the image skew. A dual wedge-tri step phantom is created for both alignment and calibration. This phantom includes two symmetrical wedges and three steps that provide the user with visual feedback on how well the scan plane is aligned with the midplane of the phantom. The phantom image consists of five line segments, each of which corresponds to one of the wedges or steps. The slopes and positions of the lines are extracted from the image and compared with the phantom model. The scan plane parameters are found so that the difference between the model and extracted features is minimized. The main advantage of this phantom is that only one frame is required to determine translations, orientations, and skew parameters of the scan plane with respect to the phantom. Experimental results with ocular imaging show the ability to achieve alignment based on this method and its potential for medical applications. Copyright 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.
Affiliation: Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dept ofMechanical Engineering, Dept of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/35892
Peer Review Status: Reviewed
Scholarly Level: Faculty

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893