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The potential effects of the mountain pine beetle on the five species of Pacific salmon in the Fraser River Basin

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Title: The potential effects of the mountain pine beetle on the five species of Pacific salmon in the Fraser River Basin
Author: Toda, Emily
Subject Keywords Coho;Sockeye;Chum;Pink;Chinook;British Columbia;Temperature;Peak Flow;Epidemic;Water;Coarse Woody Debris (CWD)
Issue Date: 2011-04
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2011-07-20
Series/Report no. University of British Columbia, Forestry Undergraduate Essays/Theses, 2010 winter session, FRST 497
Abstract: The effects of the Mountain Pine Beetle epidemic in British Columbia have the potential to affect the five species of Pacific salmon that spawn in the Fraser River basin. The lifecycles of all five species were studied to try and create a comparison among the species. Facts about the beetle, the Fraser River and Pacific salmon were collected from multiple sources to showcase what they have in common. It was found that the Mountain Pine Beetle has the potential to impact Pacific salmon directly and indirectly, in both positive and negative ways. Fewer coarse woody debris inputs into small streams, increases in small tributary temperatures, peak flow levels and timing, and increased nutrient levels can be seen to affect both adult and juvenile salmon at different points in their life cycles. Future research needs to be collected, and awareness of the potential effects needs to be shared.
Affiliation: Forest Resources Management, Dept of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/36215
Peer Review Status: Unreviewed
Scholarly Level: Undergraduate

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