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Horizontal and vertical zoning of heterogeneities in the Hawaiian mantle plume from the geochemistry of consecutive postshield volcano pairs: Kohala-Mahukona and Mauna Kea-Hualalai.

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Title: Horizontal and vertical zoning of heterogeneities in the Hawaiian mantle plume from the geochemistry of consecutive postshield volcano pairs: Kohala-Mahukona and Mauna Kea-Hualalai.
Author: Hanano, Diane; Weis, Dominique; Scoates, James S.
Issue Date: 2010
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2011-11-16
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Citation: Hanano, Diane; Weis, Dominique; Scoates, James S.; Aciego, Sarah; De Paolo, Donald J. (2010). Horizontal and vertical zoning of heterogeneities in the Hawaiian mantle plume from the geochemistry of consecutive postshield volcano pairs: Kohala-Mahukona and Mauna Kea-Hualalai. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 11(1), Q01004, dx.doi.org/10.1029/2009GC002782.
Abstract: Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions of postshield lavas from two pairs of Hawaiian volcanoes, Mauna Kea and Kohala (Kea trend) and Hualalai and Mahukona (Loa trend), allow for identification of small-scale (tens of kilometers) heterogeneities in the Hawaiian mantle plume and provide constraints on their distribution. The postshield lavas range from transitional/alkalic basalt to trachyte and are enriched in incompatible trace elements (e.g., LaN/YbN = 6.0–16.2). These lavas are characterized by a limited range of Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70343–0.70365, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51292–0.51301, and 176Hf/177Hf = 0.28311–0.28314) and have distinct Pb isotopic compositions (206Pb/204Pb = 17.89–18.44, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.44–15.49, and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.68–38.01) that correspond to their respective Kea or Loa side of the Pb-Pb isotopic boundary. Mauna Kea lavas show a systematic shift to less radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions from the shield to postshield stage and they trend to low 87Sr/86Sr toward, but not as extreme as, compositions characteristic of rejuvenated stage lavas. Hualalai postshield lavas lie distinctly above the Hf-Nd Hawaiian array and have much lower Pb isotopic ratios than shield lavas, including some of the least radiogenic values (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 17.89–18.01) of recent Hawaiian volcanoes. In contrast, comparison of Kohala with the adjacent Mahukona volcano shows that these older postshield lavas become more radiogenic in Pb during the late stages of volcanism. The isotope systematics of the postshield lavas cannot be explained by mixing between Hawaiian plume end-members (e.g., Kea, Koolau, and Loihi) or by assimilation of Pacific lithosphere and are consistent with the presence of ancient recycled lower oceanic crust (±sediments) in their source. More than one depleted component is sampled by the postshield lavas and these components are long-lived features of the Hawaiian plume that are present in both the Kea and Loa source regions. The depleted components in the postshield lavas, particularly as sampled at Hualalai, are different from the much more homogeneous component present in rejuvenated lavas. The geochemistry of the postshield lavas provides evidence for a bilateral symmetry to the plume where the compositional boundary between the Kea and Loa sources is complex and vertical components of heterogeneity are significant. An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2010 American Geophysical Union.
Affiliation: Earth and Ocean Sciences, Dept. of (EOS), Dept of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/39086
Peer Review Status: Reviewed
Scholarly Level: Faculty

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