Go to  Advanced Search

The World on the Back of the Turtle: Diplomatic Relations of the Iroquois Confederacy, 1609 – 1701

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
Blake Allen - The World on the Back of the Turtle.pdf 392.9Kb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: The World on the Back of the Turtle: Diplomatic Relations of the Iroquois Confederacy, 1609 – 1701
Author: Allen, Blake
Supervisor: Russell, Peter A.
Subject Keywords Iroquois Confederacy, Diplomatic History
Issue Date: 2012-04-27
Series/Report no. University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus, History Undergraduate Honours Essays
Abstract: A study in the diplomatic evolution of the Iroquois Confederacy’s interactions with neighbouring First Nations and European colonists during the tumultuous period which followed their defeat at Lake Champlain. This project follows their subsequent transformation from a prominent regional force to their sudden collapse as a polity of power, analyzed from an indigenous prospective. Maintaining this position of prominence meant being able to adapt to the ways in which the European presence changed their world, coupled with their ability to manage the difficulties these challenges posed to their cultural and social institutions. Relationships with the Dutch, French and English cast the illusion of strengthening the Confederacy, when in reality they weakened the fundamental structures of Iroquoia needed to maintain the polity – ultimately transforming the once feared Confederacy into a weakened nation forced to sue for peace in order to secure its survival.
Affiliation: Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences (IKBSAS) (Okanagan)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/42254
Peer Review Status: Unreviewed
Scholarly Level: Undergraduate

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893