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Heating systems analysis : a comparative investigation on the environmental affects of electrical baseboard heating and district natural gas hydronic heating systems

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Title: Heating systems analysis : a comparative investigation on the environmental affects of electrical baseboard heating and district natural gas hydronic heating systems
Author: Leung, Adrian
Issue Date: 2012-04
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2012-05-24
Series/Report no. University of British Columbia. Research in Environmental Geography. Project Conclusion Reports, 2012
Abstract: This study aims to identify the environmental costs and effects on different stakeholders involved with the implementation of electric baseboard heating and natural gas district hydronic heating solutions in buildings. In summary: 1. The difference in greenhouse gas emissions produced in electric baseboard heating and natural gas district energy heating are less than reported in an earlier study conducted by Uduman (2010) due to BC Hydro’s energy imports. This report estimates that the emissions factor in electric baseboard heating is 37.78 kg/GJ while natural gas district hydronic heating is rated at 48.9 kg/GJ. 2. Despite the higher emissions associated with natural gas district hydronic heating, district energy is recommended over electric baseboard heating because it allows for the possibility to switch to lower emitting fuels. Moreover, district heating seems to better fit the future plans of BC Hydro and FortisBC. 3. It is recommended to re-study emissions generated by electricity when BC Hydro releases its 2011 greenhouse gas emissions of its energy that includes energy imports and trading activities. In addition, other fuel sources of district energy systems should be looked into. 4. Suggests that Adera Development Corporation should study alternate methods of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, specifically researching into designs that improve building efficiency, thereby reduce the demand for heating energy.
Affiliation: Geography, Dept of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/42362
Peer Review Status: Unreviewed
Scholarly Level: Undergraduate

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