Go to  Advanced Search

Achievement and self-efficacy of students with English as a second language based on problem type in an English language-based mathematics curriculum

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
ubc_2008_fall_pel_amanda_jean.pdf 3.590Mb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: Achievement and self-efficacy of students with English as a second language based on problem type in an English language-based mathematics curriculum
Author: Pel, Amanda Jean
Degree Master of Arts - MA
Program Curriculum Studies
Copyright Date: 2008
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2009-02-25
Subject Keywords Picture problems; ESL
Abstract: Students who are learning English as a second language (ESL) have lower performance on mathematics problems based in language than students who are fully fluent in English. Students’ performance on word-based mathematics problems is directly related to their English reading comprehension and language fluency (Abedi & Lord, 2001; Brown, 2005; Hofstetter, 2003). This places students who are not fully fluent in English at a disadvantage in the mathematics classroom. Students’ self-efficacy beliefs also impacts their mathematics performance and motivation. The self-efficacy of students who are not fluent in English may be negatively impacted by their struggle with language. For this exploratory study, image-based mathematics problems were created to communicate problem solving questions with pictures instead of language or computational symbols. This problem format was investigated as a potential alternative to word-based or computation-based problems. Grade 6 students registered in ESL level 2, ESL level 4, and not registered in ESL, completed a mathematics task with four computation problems, four language-based problems, and four image-based problems. During a follow-up interview, students’ solution strategies and thought processes were explored further. The results of this study indicated that the inclusion of wordless mathematics problems, such as image-based problems, assisted some of the students who were learning basic English interpersonal communication skills. As nonroutine problems, image-based mathematics also encouraged complex thought and mathematics understanding. Students in ESL Level 2 demonstrated higher self-efficacy beliefs on image-based problems than word problems.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/5037

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893