Go to  Advanced Search

Immigrant and refugee students’ achievement in Vancouver secondary schools: an examination of the common underlying proficiency model

Show full item record

Files in this item

Files Size Format Description   View
ubc_1997-0166.pdf 4.506Mb Adobe Portable Document Format   View/Open
 
Title: Immigrant and refugee students’ achievement in Vancouver secondary schools: an examination of the common underlying proficiency model
Author: Clarke, Debra Kathleen
Degree Master of Arts - MA
Program Language and Literacy Education
Copyright Date: 1997
Subject Keywords Second language acquisition research; Literacy - British Columbia - Vancouver; Language acquisition - British Columbia - Vancouver
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of first language literacy and educational backgrounds on literacy and academic performance in a second language and, to learn more about students' perceptions of their linguistic, academic and social development in schooling in which the language of instruction is English. Fifty-five students were selected from seven high schools in the Vancouver School District, Vancouver, British Columbia. Information about students' first language (L1) literacy and educational experiences, including previous instruction in English was obtained on arrival. Proficiency in second language (L2) reading and first and second language writing was observed on arrival and in the spring of 1996, after a minimum of four years of English-only schooling, using standardized and holistic measures. Grade Point Averages (GPA) were calculated for students' achievement in four academic subjects. Analysis by ANOVA showed a significant difference in the length of time spent in ESL due to years of previous English study (F (7,43) = 4.26, p = .0012). Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were calculated to observe relationships between L1 literacy and time spent in ESL, L1 education and time spent in ESL, and L2 reading and writing and achievement in English, social studies, science and math. Significant relationships were found between proficiency in L2 reading and writing and academic achievement, as measured by GPA. Significant findings were also obtained for L1 literacy and time spent in ESL (-.33, p < .05). Orthographic similarity was not a predictor of L2 reading, as measured on a standardized test of reading comprehension (t = .105, p = .747). Results of the study showed that L1 literacy development, L1 schooling, and previous English study enhanced acquisition of English, as measured by time spent in ESL. The researcher concluded that L1 literacy and education are important factors affecting the rate and level of L2 proficiency attained and academic achievement. Implications from findings suggest that in schooling where the language of instruction is English, students who have not acquired literacy skills in L1 have different needs and face a greater challenge than students who are literate in L1 .
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/5851
Series/Report no. UBC Retrospective Theses Digitization Project [http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/retro_theses/]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

All items in cIRcle are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

UBC Library
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6T 1Z1
Tel: 604-822-6375
Fax: 604-822-3893