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Relationship of site index to estimates of soil moisture and nutrients for western redcedar in south coastal British Columbia

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Title: Relationship of site index to estimates of soil moisture and nutrients for western redcedar in south coastal British Columbia
Author: Klinka, Karel; Kayahara, Gordon J.; Chourmouzis, Christine
Subject Keywords Coastal western hemlock;Forest productivity;Site index;Site quality;Western hemlock;Western redcedar
Issue Date: 1997
Publicly Available in cIRcle 2008-04-23
Publisher Forest Sciences Department, University of British Columbia
Series/Report no. Scientia Silvica extension series, 1209-952X, no. 5
Abstract: Where timber production is the primary management objective, knowledge of the relationship between the potential productivity of candidate tree species and levels of light, heat, nutrient, moisture and aeration is necessary for species- and site-specific decision making. For example, foresters need to decide which tree species to regenerate on a particular harvested area to obtain maximum sustainable productivity. Similarily, when considering the application of silvicultural treatments such as spacing or fertilizing, foresters need to determine whether the potential productivity of a particular site warrants the cost of the treatment. We used the site index (height of dominant trees at breast height age) of western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn. ex D. Don.) as a measure of productivity, and described the pattern of mean site index in relation to field identified soil moisure and soil nutrient regimes.
Affiliation: Forest Sciences, Dept of
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/765
Peer Review Status: Peer-Reviewed

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