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Factors controlling guided circular saw cutting behavior

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Title: Factors controlling guided circular saw cutting behavior
Author: Wang, Shufan
Degree Master of Applied Science - MASc
Program Mechanical Engineering
Copyright Date: 1999
Abstract: This study consists of an experimental and theoretical investigation of the factors controlling guided circular saw cutting behavior. The work includes preliminary experimental studies, investigation of saw-workpiece interaction mechanisms, sawworkpiece interaction experimental studies and development of a theoretical model. In the preliminary experimental studies, the fundamental questions are: how do guided saws work, and what are the most significant saw design factors? Extensive experiments were conducted to investigate these questions. A fixed-collar saw closely follows the theoretical expectations. A guided saw only weakly follows theoretical expectations. The interaction between the saw and workpiece was identified as an important factor controlling how guided saws work. It is identified as being a significant saw design factor by experimental observations combined with industrial and previous experiences. Interactions between the saw and workpiece are identified as key factors controlling guided saw cutting behavior. Two aspects of saw-workpiece interaction are: 1) the interaction between the saw body and the workpiece, and 2) the interaction between the saw teeth and the workpiece. The first interaction type influences the cutting stability of a guided saw compared with a fixed-collar saw. The second interaction type influences the stability of a climb-cutting saw compared with a counter-cutting saw. Extensive cutting tests were performed to explore the effects of the two interaction types. In general, the experimental results supported the theoretical expectations. A guided saw was found to cut more accurately than a fixed-collar saw. A climb-cutting saw was found to cut more accurately than a counter-cutting saw. A simplified theoretical model of a saw cutting a piece of wood was developed to complement the experimental results and further support the interaction mechanisms. For this model, the practical cutting factors were gradually added to make it more realistic. A computer program was used to implement this model. Typically, this model supports the interaction mechanisms and the experimental results.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/9152
Series/Report no. UBC Retrospective Theses Digitization Project [http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/retro_theses/]

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